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Friday, August 23, 2013

Some of My Glock Modifications

As many of you have seen on the Facebook page there are a number of modifications that I have completed on my Glock 19. There are a number of reason for what I have done, but I wanted to do a quick run down on a couple of them to help people understand why I did what I did.

The very first thing that I did to the Glock was the "candle method" grip reduction. While this is not as drastic as other reductions it did help change the grip angle enough to make it more comfortable to me. 

The "candle method" is literally taking your Glock and holding it over a candle to heat the back strap up to the point that it is "moldable". Once it is heated up enough you press the back strap down on a solid surface, rolling it side to side to keep it even. What this does is flatten out the Glock "hump" which gives the Glock it's infamous grip angle.


One thing to be very careful with is to make sure you don't melt the polymer (see picture above), this was a mistake that I made but was able to "repair" the damage by stippling the frame. I ended up using a heat gun set on low and slowly heated the back of the grip up so I could form it to be comfortable for me.

The second modification I completed was stippling the grip. Since I had already melted bubbles into the back strap I knew I was going to have to sand it down and do a stippling job. So I sanded the burned area down along with all of the factory grip dots. 

One of the biggest reasons people stipple their grips is to add additional grip to their guns, for those times when you've been out long enough that your hands are really sweaty, or your gun gets dropped in the mud, etc. I did it because I like the way it feels in my hands and the extra grip is an added bonus.


Once I had the area smoothed out I took my wood burning tool with the small tip and went to work. I had started with doing the small dot pattern but wasn't happy with the way that it looked, so I started to angle the tip and came up with this pattern.


At first I thought it might have been too aggressive of a stipple but have come to really appreciate it. Even though it looks aggressive it does not rub your hands raw, but it does give a nice "stickiness" to the gun.



The third thing that I completed was removing the finger grooves from the grip. I did this because my fingers did not land right on the grip and it was uncomfortable. 



I accomplished this using a Dremel with a sand drum, slowly removing the grooves until everything was even and smoothed out. I was surprised at how much of a difference this made. I could have smoothed it out with sandpaper but had already decided I was going to do a 360* stipple so once the grooves were gone I started stippling. The picture below is after the stippling was all completed.


While there are many reasons on the Internet for doing the modifications that I completed on this gun, it really is up to the individual user on what they want to do. The slight grip reduction has made the gun much more comfortable for me to shoot, while removing the finger grooves was also another comfort modification. 

Stippling has a few advantages as I listed before, but it also gives a uniqueness to your individual firearm. 

There are a lot of great companies out there that are offering their modification services, and there are also a lot of bad companies who turn out terrible work. I personally am a do it yourselfer and truly enjoyed taking on the project. I feel that the personal touch I put into the gun makes it that much more fun to shoot.

In closing I will ask. What have you done as far as aesthetic modifications to your gun?

3 comments:

  1. I do this for a living and I have to say on all of the Glock models, grip modifications are a must! WW

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'm sending my Glocks to Calvin once all the dumb crap stops that's taking all my extra money!

    ReplyDelete
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